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Common medical words associated with gastroparesis

  Abdomen:

 The large cavity between the chest and the pelvis; it contains the  stomach, small intestine, and colon.

  Anorexia:

 Lack or loss of the appetite for food.

  Antiemetics:

 Drugs that work to decrease feelings of nausea.

  Belching (burping):

 Voiding of gas through the mouth.

  Bezoar:

 A mass of indigestible matter found trapped in the stomach.

  Bloating:

 Feeling of abdominal distension or fullness.

  Chronic:

 Of long duration.

  Dyspepsia:

 Abdominal pain or discomfort which occurs after eating.

  Dysphagia:

 Sensation of food or liquid sticking in the oesophagus (gullet,  food tube)

  Early satiety:

 A feeling that the stomach is over-filled soon after starting to eat,  leading to inability to eat a normal sized meal.

  Functional disorder:

 Any condition in which an organ or part of the body does not work  the way it is supposed to, in the absence of blockage,  inflammation or cancer.

  Globus:

 The sensation of a lump in the throat.

  Halitosis:

 A foul (unpleasant) odour from the mouth.

  Heartburn:                   

 A burning feeling in the lower chest.

  Nausea:                         

 A sensation of needing to vomit.

  Motility:

 Contractions of the muscle of the digestive tract and movement  of its contents.

  Odynophagia:

 Pain in the chest as food or drink passes through the  oesophagus.

  Postprandial fullness:

 Feeling of excessive fullness following a meal.

  Prokinetics:

 Drugs that work to improve gastric motility.

  Regurgitation:

 Return of stomach contents into the throat or mouth.

  Vomiting:

 Ejection of matter from the stomach through the mouth  associated with nausea and retching.




MORE LINKS

If you are interested in other gastrointestinal-focused information and intervention websites developed and hosted at
Swinburne University of Technology,
please go to:

IBSclinic.org.au for individuals with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

IBDclinic.org.au for individuals with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

DISCLAIMER

This website and its content is not intended or recommended as a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek advice of your own physician or other qualified health care professional regarding any medical questions or conditions.

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